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How to Use a Dipping Belt

Dipping Belt Exercise Guide

SAFETY WARNING

When properly used, the dip/chin-up belt is safe and a tool that can help
improve the quality of workouts. That said, all exercise programs and
equipment carry risk with use.

Please always use caution when performing exercises and only use equipment
as intended. Failure to do so can result in injury. Remember, safety first.

Please read these instructions prior to using your dip/chin belt.

Reference these regularly to ensure you fully understand the proper use of the
device. Remember, safety first.

Consult your Doctor before beginning any exercise program. If you experience
any pain, dizziness or shortness of breath when performing any of the
movements described, stop all activity immediately and consult your Doctor.

If you are taking any medication, you should consult your Doctor before
beginning any exercise program. Do not take any risks beyond your
level of experience and fitness.

The exercises described in this program are to be used as guidelines only and
are not to be treated as a substitute for any exercise routine that may have been
prescribed to you by your Doctor. The recommendations described here are for
educational purposes only and are not medical guidelines.

Before every use check for any damage to the belt and do not use if
damaged. Particularly, look for any damage to the threading of the belt,
links in the chain, and the connection of the chain to the belt.
Always perform a general warm-up activity before using the belt.

The exact warm-up you perform should be relative to your ability and
the type of workout you will perform.

Perform only the exercises described here, unless you have strict
instruction on how to perform additional exercises.

Always utilize proper form. Doing so will help prevent injury and aid
in performance.

Avoid straining, holding your breath during exercise, going to muscle failure,
and similar activities, as these increase the risk of injury.

Perform each exercise in a slow and controlled manner, as this
reduces the risk of injury.

Use a full range of motion during each exercise, as this increases the
effectiveness of the exercise, which should provide you with better
results over time.

INTRODUCTION

The dip/chin belt is useful for a number of exercises other than dips and
chin-ups. These exercises include weighted leg lifts, weighted push-ups,
self-assisted squats, weighted hip-hinging, and weighted muscle-ups,
among others.

The weighted belt is a tool that can effectively engage upper body and lower
body muscles when enough exercises are selected. For example, performing
weighted hip hinges, dips, pull ups and hip belt squats can work the entire body.
Worked muscles include the abs, obliques, lower back muscles, spinal erectors,
deltoids (shoulders), trapezius (trap muscles, upper, middle, and lower portions),
latissimus dorsi (lats or "wings"), forearm muscles, finger flexors and extensors,
quadriceps, hamstrings, and connective tissue at all joints.

This guide provides
you with:

· Instructions for how to complete
five specific exercises

· Images to help you understand
each exercise

· Possible variations or modifiers
for each exercise

By using a dip/chin belt to
complete the movements
included in this guide, you
can expect to:

· Increase full body strength

· Improve muscular endurance

· Build muscle

· Strengthen connective tissues

EXERCISES

Several tried and true exercises exist for individuals who want to make the most
use of a dip/chin belt. The ones we think are best are included in this manual.
While you should perform the exercises in the listed manner, the exact sets and
reps you use will be a decision you need to make. Due to differences in ability,
each person will only be able to do what he or she can do, not what someone
else can do. For example, if you're new to weighted pull-ups you may only be
able to add 25 pounds of resistance, while a person experienced with weighted
pull-ups may be able to add 45, 90, or even 135+ pounds of resistance.
Perform each exercise in the manner listed and choose rep and sets schemes
that are appropriate for your skill level, ensuring you have plenty of rest between
sets to recover and safely perform the subsequent set. Remember, safety first.

WEIGHTED PULL-UP

Primary Muscles: Posterior Deltoids, Trapezius (All Parts), Latissimus Dorsi
(Exact Focus Varies Based On Grip)

Secondary Muscles: Biceps, Finger Flexor/Extensors, Forearm Muscles,
Core (Obliques, Abdominals, Lower Back)

To complete this exercise, either use a low hanging pull-up bar that you can reach from the ground in a standing position, or use a box to elevate you, making sure it is set-up in a manner that allows you to clear the box when performing pull-ups.

Do not try to jump and grab a pull-up bar with weight attached to you by
the dip/chin belt.

1. Start by attaching the weight belt to your waist. Adjust the chain length as needed, but most people are comfortable with the weight between the knees and groin.

2. Grasp the pull-up bar with both hands, using a thumbed grip (thumb overlaps fingers). A thumbless grip or "cup" grip is not recommended.

3. While maintaining tension in the back, shoulder, and arm muscles, extend yourself into a "dead hang" position, allowing the back muscles to reach full extension.

4. With a strong, but steady (not jerky) movement, use the back, deltoid, and arm muscles to pull yourself to the bar.

5. At a minimum, your chin should pass the bar at the top of the movement. At a maximum, your chest should touch the bar.

6. In a controlled manner, lower yourself back to the starting position.

WEIGHTED DIP

Primary Muscles: Pectorals, Triceps, Anterior Deltoids

Secondary Muscles: Finger Flexors/Extensors, Forearm Muscles, Core
(Obliques, Abdominals, Lower Back)

1. Start by attaching the weight belt to your waist. Adjust the chain length as needed, but most people are comfortable with the weight between the knees and groin.

2. Step into the dip station, grab the dip handles with a firm grip, and lift yourself into the extended position of the dip. Your elbows should be locked out.

3. In a controlled manner, while maintaining tension, lower yourself
by bending the arms and allowing a slight lean forward of the body until
your upper arm is parallel with the ground.

4. Push yourself back into the extended position of the lift by pressing into the dip bars using your triceps, chest, and shoulders.

This exercise primarily focuses on the chest, triceps, and front shoulder muscles.
To focus more on the triceps, attempt to minimize forward lean of the body.
To maximize chest and shoulder involvement, allow the forward lean of the body.
With each variation, focus on using the targeted muscles to perform the movement.

For example, if targeting the triceps and keeping the torso upright, focus on
extending and contracting the triceps through range of motion and attempt to not
use the chest or shoulders.

WEIGHTED KNEE RAISE

Primary Muscles: Abdominals, Hip Flexors

Secondary Muscles: Core (Obliques, Abdominals, Lower Back), Quadriceps

This exercise can be completed using a dip station or similar device, or a pull-up bar or any other overhead object that can safely support your weight. In the image, the trainer uses the crossbar of a power rack. To complete this exercise, either use a low hanging pull-up bar that you can reach from the ground in a standing position, a dip station, or use a box to elevate you, making sure it is set-up in a manner that allows you to clear the box when performing the knee raise. Do not try to jump and grab a pull-up bar or other similar overhead support with weight attached to you by the dip/chin belt.

1. Start by attaching the weight belt to your waist. Adjust the chain length as
needed, but most people are comfortable with the weight between the knees and
groin. For this exercise, the weight needs to be to the front of the body, resting on the thighs, as your thighs will support the weight as you lift your knees.

2. Grasp the pull-up bar with both hands, using a thumbed grip (thumb overlaps fingers). A thumbless grip or "cup" grip is not recommended.

3. While maintaining tension in the back, shoulder, and arm muscles,
extend yourself into a "dead hang" position, allowing the back muscles
to reach full extension.

4. With a strong, but steady (not jerky) movement, use abdominal muscles to pull your legs and the weight toward your upper body.

5. At the top of the movement, your thighs should be parallel to the ground.

6. In a controlled manner, lower your legs back to the starting position.

WEIGHTED SELF-ASSISTED SQUAT

Primary Muscles: Quadriceps, Hamstrings, Core (Obliques,
Abdominals, Lower Back)

Secondary Muscles: Calves, Finger Flexors/Extensors, Forearm Muscles,
Posterior Deltoids, Trapezius (All Parts)

The weighted self-assisted squat is an ideal movement for people who do not have access to a squat rack or similar device, or individuals who cannot hold weight at their shoulders for some reason (such as an injury).

1. Start by attaching the weight belt to your waist. Adjust the chain
length as needed, but most people are comfortable with the weight
between the knee and groin.

2. Stand in front of a power rack, doorway, or similar structure that you can firmly grasp with both hands. Grasp the structure with your arms extended.

3. While maintaining tension in the back, shoulder, and arm muscles,
lower yourself into the squat position. Ideally, you should reach parallel,
which is achieved when the hip flexor is in line withthe top of the knee.
However, use the range of motion that is safely possible.

4. From the bottom, return the start position by flexing your quadriceps, glutes,
and hamstrings.

HIP BELT SQUAT

Primary Muscles: Quadriceps, Hamstrings, Core
(Obliques, Abdominals, Lower Back)

Secondary Muscles: Calves

The hip belt squat is perform much like any other squat, but closely resembles the air squat. As with the weighted self-assisted squat, this exercise is an ideal
movement for people who do not have access to a squat rack or similar device or individuals who cannot hold weight at their shoulders for some reason (such as an injury). The trainer in the series of images uses a pair of boxes to elevate himself. This is helpful if you cannot achieve parallel without the weight touching the ground. If you can achieve parallel without the weight touching the ground, the boxes are not required. If using boxes or similar objects to elevate yourself, be sure to set these up first. Ensure they are secure and test them using only your weight first, to make sure the items are in the ideal position to facilitate
your squat. From the bottom, return to the start position by flexing your quadriceps, glutes, and hamstrings.

1. Start by attaching the weight belt to your waist. Adjust the chain length as
needed, but most people are comfortable with the weight between the knees and groin.

2. Step onto your platform(s), if using.

3. Place your arms out in front of you, fully extended and parallel to the
ground (you can adjust this as you see fit).

4. While maintaining tension in the back, shoulder, and arm muscles, lower
yourself into the squat position. Ideally, you should reach parallel, which is
achieved when the hip flexor is in line with the top of the knee. However, use the
range of motion that is safely possible.

5. From the bottom, return to the start position by flexing your quadriceps,
glutes, and hamstrings.

SUMMARY

Thank you for reading this dip/chin belt exercise guide. We hope that you found it useful and it will help you to get the best use of your equipment. If you have any
questions or concerns, please do get in touch and we’ll do our best to help.